Emma Stone vs Emma Watson

I’m sure you all saw that incident at the Oscar’s this year. You know which one I mean. The bit where the Best Picture Oscar went to La La Land for a good 2 or 3 minutes before it was correctly awarded to Moonlight. Eek.

That event took center stage this year and I think slightly stole the limelight from the other winners which was a shame. One of the other winners of the night was Emma Stone who (correctly) won for Best Actress.

Take a look at this video where at around 6 minutes in, Emma Stone is asked an interesting question.

A journalist asks Stone if she is going to take Emma Watson out for dinner after turning down the role. Stone, quite rightly, states that Watson is doing pretty well regardless of what she’s insinuating.

emma watson and stoneCan we please stop pitting actresses, women, against each other!?

I certainly haven’t seen Brad Pitt asked to thank a fellow actor for a presumptuous ‘bad career move’ that assisted his own.

Furthermore, the internet is now filled with the casting drama regarding Watson simply turning ‘La La Land’ down as she was already connected to ‘Beauty and the Beast’. Both of which requiring lengthy singing and dancing training. Not to mention one being filmed in La La Land itself, L.A. and BatB being shot in London. It was pretty unfeasible.

However, the media continues to run with this ‘battle of the Emmas’. And nowhere near as much media hype has been made regarding the Miles Teller/Ryan Gosling ‘feud’; will Ryan be taking Miles out to dinner to thank him for turning down his La La Land role I wonder. The fact is this happens every single day. It is extremely rare that any job only ever gets one applicant and someone isn’t beaten to it.

The journalist asking Stone this question was a woman and we are definitely not innocent parties here. Women are some of the worst when it comes to pitting females against each other.

Both Stone and Watson are in two of the biggest films of 2017 and I’m pretty sure they’ll both be fine regardless of their choices. And, dare I say it, happy for each other. Good roles for women are rare in Hollywood and we need to start celebrating successful women in the industry.

 

 

 

 

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Imposter Syndrome

Over the past year I’ve read Bossypants by Tina Fey, Yes Please by Amy Poehler, #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso and Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg. And if memory serves, I remember every single one of them describing struggling with something called Imposter Syndrome.

A quick wiki describes Imposter Syndrome as

a psychological phenomenon in which people are unable to internalize their accomplishments. Despite external evidence of their competence, those with the syndrome remain convinced that they are frauds and do not deserve the success they have achieved… [it] is particularly common among high-achieving women.”

Before I even start, I just cannot with this. That we have people like Adam Sandler walking around without a care in the world, who hasn’t made a good film since I was still in nappies, and these extremely hard working and evidently successful women feel this way. It makes me kinda mad. The feeling manifests in very different ways- women saying that their achievements aren’t good enough, or aren’t as good as their peers, as well as expressing shock and dismissiveness when praised with good work claiming that the success was merely luck or they had a lot of help.

Emma Watson is another extremely successful celebrity who has admitted to being plagued with this. As well as being a world famous actress, she is now an ambassador for UN Women and an incredible role model. However, she still seems to be coming to grips with her incredible success and achievements; all of which she is very deserving of. In British Vogue’s September issue she explains that, “when I receive recognition for my acting, I feel incredibly uncomfortable. I tend to turn in on myself. I feel like an imposter.” She also describes in an interview with Rookie Mag that you can read here about how she felt that “any moment, someone’s going to find out I’m a total fraud, and that I don’t deserve any of what I’ve achieved. I can’t possibly live up to what everyone thinks I am and what everyone’s expectations of me are.”

Emma Watson at UN Women conference #HeForShe

The Imposter Syndrome originates from a study conducted by Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Imes back in 1978 called ‘The Imposter Phenomenon in High Achieving Women: Dynamics and Therapeutic Intervention’, you can read the study here. They explain that the Imposter Syndrome itself could manifest in “societal sex-role stereotyping” which would explain why the syndrome appears a lot more in women than in men. Girls grow up in societies which encourage them to be pretty and not play in the dirt, to not be bossy, to be ambitious but not too ambitious as to make men feel emasculated. As Clance and Imes go on to say, “a woman’s femininity is called into question by her success”- no wonder women are so quick to dismiss their successes. Being a ‘go-getter’ and ambitious are attractive qualities in men, it is a shame the same cannot be said for women. This article describes how the word ambition is a ‘dirty word’ and is practically an insult and when “applied to women, it’s almost a slur – the subtext somehow being that ambitious women are out to trample colleagues on the ladder to success, with family and friends littered somewhere down the bottom of the life priorities list.”

Similarly, the media have continuously portrayed successful women as being extremely unnattractive. Think Sarah Jessica Parker in ‘I Don’t Know How She Does It’, or Sandra Bullock in ‘The Proposal’. It would be nice if women were encouraged to be successful and own it. Not to be described as ‘full of herself’ or ‘bitchy’ for knowing she’s a badass business woman and a successful woman period, whether she has two kids and a dog waiting for her at home or Netflix and popcorn.